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Hereditary Cancer

We offer comprehensive genetic diagnostics for a number of disorders associated with hereditary cancer susceptibility. These cancer panels cover genes associated with cancer types originating from the gastrointestinal tract, the endocrine and neuroendocrine systems, different organs such as the lungs, kidneys, liver, pancreas, skin, and eyes, gathering the known genetic defects presenting early in childhood.

 

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What genetic diagnostics can offer patients with hereditary cancer

Hereditary cancer syndromes account for approximately 5–10% of all cancer. When multiple relatives on the same side of the family have the same or related forms of cancer, present with cancer at an early age, or multiple cancers present in an individual, hereditary cancer is suspected. The most common inherited cancer syndromes are hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome (also known as hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer), Li-Fraumeni syndrome, Cowden syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, Von-Hippel Lindau syndrome, and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and type 2. Most of the hereditary cancer syndromes are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner and penetrance is high.

Genetic testing is the most effective way to identify individuals with a genetic predisposition toward developing cancer. The risk of developing breast cancer is 65% for BRCA1 mutation carriers, and patients with Lynch syndrome have a 78% lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer. Genetic diagnostics makes personal cancer risk assessment possible, and knowing the inherited genetic defect can be useful when planning the treatment or follow-up of both unaffected and affected family members. Cancer mortality can be significantly reduced in high-risk patients through regular examination and preventive strategies. For example, colonoscopic screening at 3-year intervals cuts the colorectal cancer risk by more than half, prevents deaths, and decreases the overall mortality by about 65% in Lynch syndrome families (PMID: 10784581). Moreover, multi-gene panels can provide genetic diagnostics for patients with an atypical phenotype or family history of multiple cancers. Additionally, genetic diagnosis can help in family planning.

Our diagnostic process

From sample to clinical interpretation

  1. Ordering and sample preparation

    After receiving a patient’s medical history and sample we start the sample preparations in our CLIA certified laboratory.

  2. Sequencing

    We sequence the DNA in our lab with our proprietary targeted sequencing method OS-Seq™, developed at Stanford.

  3. Data analysis and interpretation

    We use our own proprietary automated bioinformatics pipeline to produce clinically relevant information - fast and reliably.

  4. Clinical statement

    Our team of geneticists and clinicians produce a comprehensive clinical statement to support the diagnosis of your patient.

  1. Sample
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  2. Sequencing
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  3. Analysis
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  4. Report
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